Great Lede/Bad Lede

GREAT LEDE

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/21/the-benefits-of-exercising-outdoors/
While the allure of the gym — climate-controlled, convenient and predictable — is obvious, especially in winter, emerging science suggests there are benefits to exercising outdoors that can’t be replicated on a treadmill, a recumbent bicycle or a track.

BAD LEDE

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/18/dangers-of-too-much-calcium/
Calcium is an important nutrient for bone health, but new research suggests that older women who take large amounts may be at increased risk of heart disease and death.

Swedish researchers followed 61,433 women born between 1914 and 1948 for an average of 19 years, confirming causes of death with a Swedish government registry. The investigators also used questionnaires to record the women’s food and calcium supplement intake.

THOUGHTS:

I picked these two articles because yes, they had a good lede and a bad one … but also because I felt like they were equally informational. In other words, I think that often, we blame a boring lede on the fact that the information covered is boring. This, however, is not much of an excuse.

In this case, the two articles are both very informative, and their ledes have the potential to be equally as boring – however, the first somehow manages to grab me a whole heck of a lot more than the second. I marked some trigger words that contribute to why it is good, in addition to its humor woven into it.

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